Toast Etiquette Manageable Science

Giving that maid of honor or best man toast isn’t an easy thing to do.

Say for instance you already know what you want to say and how you want to say it. You have a few funny stories sprinkled in that will entertain the audience while not embarrassing the bride and/or groom. You have a few heart-felt lines that you know will mean a lot to the couple and will impress the friends, family, and invited guests in attendance. And you have that perfect last line — the consummate conclusion to your three minute long toast — that will bring applause when you finish raising your glass.

Many would say you’re lucky to be so far along in the toast-writing process. I, however, say there’s still much to learn. Your last major hurdle?

Becoming accustomed with toast etiquette.

To begin searching for what you will need to do, try finding out where and when you will be giving your best man or maid of honor toast. Will it be at the rehearsal dinner? And if so, where is the rehearsal dinner located? If the dinner is going to be held in a less formal atmosphere in front of only some family and a few friends, then you can a slightly less formal speech — and vice versa. Say you’re told that you will be giving your toast at the wedding reception, just after the first dance but before dinner (when everyone is still there). Oh, and the reception is being held in the ballroom at the local country club or 4-star hotel. Hearing this would make me prepare a far more formal toast than if I were delivering the speech in the former scenario. All in all, it is vital to “know” your audience. Know whom you’ll be speaking to during the big moment and then plan accordingly.

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